Meal Planning

Meal planning is an instrumental part in planning a camping trip. While important, it is the only part of the camping trip that does not demand large amounts of paperwork. What Meal Planning does require is access to your fellow Scouts and a local grocery store. Remember: your patrol is counting on you – otherwise they don’t EAT. Please don’t forget to bring the food!

  1. Consult with your patrol and determine what you want to eat, appoint a cook and assistant cook for the camping trip. Remember: The meal must be easy to make and transport. The meals should usually consist of a breakfast, lunch, dinner, and a final breakfast. However, be prepared to plan around schedules. Occasionally there may be a need for a first night dinner as well, but usually Scouts bring their own as a bag dinner.

  2. With a troop adult, the designated cook should review the Scouts attending the campout for allergies and cultural restrictions that may limit what can be eaten.

  3. With the assistant cook, the cook and his parents should visit the grocery and buy the agreed-upon food. This is a great form to help you with planning meals: http://www.troop205tx.org/Grubmaster/Troop%20205%20Patrol%20Meal%20Planner.pdf

  1. Give the receipt for the food to the troop treasurer, who will compensate you for the cost.

  2. Visit the Troop Trailer at Mapleton Nurseries and ensure that your patrol’s cook gear is in order.

  3. Pack the food in a wheeled cooler, preferably marked with the patrol’s name.

  4. Now that it is in a cooler, transport it to the campsite with the rest of the patrol. If you come to the trip later than the rest of the patrol, have someone else bring it to the campsite.

  5. Prepare/cook and eat the food you’ve bought.

  6. Leftover food should be placed back in the cooler and returned to the Cook’s house along with the patrol’s cook gear.

  7. It is the responsibility of the cook to clean the patrol’s cook gear and return it to the trailer at Mapleton Nurseries. The cook can delegate the cleanup to other patrol members, and most of it should be cleaned in the field. But the cook is responsible to return everything cleaner than it was found. The cook can do whatever they want with the leftover food.

 

Cooking Meals

Meals themselves depend on the tastes and dietary restrictions of the patrol in question. Included below are a list of web pages with meal suggestions and full menus.

http://www.scoutorama.com/recipe/

http://www.troop205tx.org/Grubmaster/Troop%20205%20Patrol%20Meal%20Planner.pdf

http://www.boyscouttrail.com/boy-scouts/boy-scout-recipes.asp

http://www.macscouter.com/cooking/docs/FoilCook.pdf  (NOTE: it’s probably best to pre-cook chicken for foil packets to be sure it will be safe to eat. Other meats usually cook through enough)

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